The 3 Keys to Virtual Reality

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Key Issues of VR

The wonderful new world of Virtual Reality is exciting. There is no denying that. However, for a VR newbie looking to uncover the technical side to the technology, it may be an instant headache once you lift the hood off of the VR engine. Not only do VR developers need to have a strong two-fold knowledge of partial graphics, but they also need to knowledgeable of technologies such as gyroscopes and filters as well. Complex in nature, it may be difficult for the newcomer to know where to start. This article aims to give you the breakdown of the 3 main components of VR: immersion, stereoscopy and 3D.

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VR’s Goal and the Challenges it Faces

The ultimate mission of VR is to allow users to perform interactions and undergo experiences in the virtual environment just as would they feel in the real environment. To achieve this, first, it is imperative to successfully block the external world’s inputs to the user assigned to experience VR. The best way to do this is to cover up the eyes using some device such as a box, so that the external facilities and surroundings are not visible and stay completely in the virtual image environment.

Immersion

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Stereoscopy

To learn about the stereoscopy, one needs to understand the manner in which people perceive depth. The perception of depth in the monocular vision is a result of brain learning. Therefore, binocular vision is quite necessary to perceive it. The depth cues include perspective projection, the level of image details, occlusion as well as lighting, shadows and motion rates. The most primary reason is nevertheless, binocular disparity.

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3D

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3D and Stereoscopy — Is there a difference?

Good question. Quick answer — Yes. 3D only involves monocular rendering while stereoscopy requires binocular rendering to form a stereoscopic effect. 3D actually does not touch on depth perception. For example, if you stare at a rotating cube for a long time, you will be unable to tell whether it is a clockwise or an anticlockwise rotation. However, if we render the cube into two with a parallax and see it through the VR box, such confusion ceases to exist.

Conclusion

Under the hood of VR lies 3 vastly complex fascinating technologies which all work together to bring the world Virtual Reality. Hopefully VR newbies now have a better launch pad to jump a level up in VR. Leave questions and comments below.

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